Reviews

Mastering the Game of Thrones

“The collection of essays analyzing our favorite series is a great example of how deep you can go exploring your top shows…and the credits, fan art, language, screen angles, texts, and much much more.”  – Valerie Estelle Frankel

“Battis and Johnson have assembled a volume that stands on its own both as rigorous criticism and as an accessible way for rabid fans to lose themselves in Westeros all over again…recommended.” –Library Journal

Prize of Night

“Well-crafted, imaginative and inventive, Prize of Night also boasts a fresh plot, memorable characters and nonstop action.”  – RT Book Reviews

Pile of Bones

“If you like Game of Thrones, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, or D&D, you will love this book. If you’re a grad student, or have ever been a grad student, you will love this book. If you’ve ever secretly wished that you could cross into a magical world, you will love this book.”  – GoodReads

Night Child

Shortlisted for Sunburst Award for Excellence in Canadian Literature of the Fantastic

Night Child is an adult crime / fantasy / vampire novel that approaches all three genres from a completely new angle…Battis plays to his strengths; good characterisation; a passion for the dark; and a wonderful seam of dry, sometimes bitchy humour running throughout the tale.”  – Fantasy Book Reviews

Homofiles:  Theory, Sexuality, and Graduate Studies

“In essays filled with personal insight and theoretical rigor, Homofiles introduces us to a new generation of queer graduate students. This book proves once again how much LGBT studies has to say not just about the unequal power relations endemic in academia, but the intersections of race, gender, sexuality, and embodiment we grapple with daily.”  – Sarah E. Chinn, director of the Center for Lesbian and Gay Studies at the Graduate Center at CUNY

“Provocative, original, and moving. With this new book, Battis has assembled the next generation of scholars who are troubling the soul of queer studies.”  –  Kevin Kumashiro, author of The Seduction of Common Sense: How the Right has Framed the Debate on America’s Schools